How an athlete should plan his daily nutrition (Part 1)

Many athletes are training so hard to be in top shape for their career. This training need to be complimented with the right set of diet in order for any athlete to achieve their aims. With good diet, and adequate training, coupled with quality supplements which are ready available in the market today, an athlete can soar to the top of his career in a very short time.

In this two part article, we will be examining how best to approach the diet issue with the hectic schedules of most athlete. We will also look at the best supplements available and how to get the best out of your diet when you don’t have all the food available at your selection.

The perfect planning

Before discussing the topic in full, let look at what constitutes a good diet for an athlete.

Macronutrients

Carbohydrates

Complex carbohydrate is a very important component in every athlete diet. Glucose is the primary source of energy for their body during physical activities. Ensure you are getting enough of carbohydrate from your meal. About 50-75 gram or more during and after training is recommended. Sources of carbohydrate include whole grain bread, oats, whole wheat pasta, brown rice and barley

Protein

Protein rich foods are equally important in an athlete diet. Athletes required as much as twice of the protein intake of an average adult and it provide them with the essential amino acids that their body would need during training and to help them in recovering and healing of cells and muscles tissue that might have been damaged as a result of their engagement in physical activities.

Athletes are required to take up to one gram per pound of body weight and more if they are interested in adding to their muscle mass. You should try and eat about 25-39 grams per meal, which is equivalent to 100grams of protein gotten from consuming carbs. It is advisable that athletes select foods with complete ratio of amino acids, such as those from animal sources over vegetarian. It is always a good idea to combine two food groups such as beans and whole grain, together to always ensure that the amino acid content is complete. Examples of foods rich in protein include lean cuts of red meat, fish, nuts and seeds, chicken and turkey and legumes.

This is all for this part. In part two of this article, we will continue to examine how an athlete should plan his daily nutrition by continuing on our discussion on what constitutes a good diet for an athlete and finally capping it with how best to plan meals and tips on timing.